Gordita Si, Fea No – On Being a Plus Size Afro-Latina – Marlena M. Matute

While I identify as Afro-Latina today, my parents never really bothered to explain the race component of our background.  I find that to be interesting, considering they are both of African descent, thanks in part to the Afro-Antillean migration in Panama for the construction of the Canal, and my mother is of the Ngäbe-Buglé (Guaymi)…

Meet Destiny Corporan: Afro-Dominican Tarot Reader and Reiki Master

Spiritual Healing is an essential practice that many use to contribute to improving their overall wellbeing and helps with having better health. From yoga, medidiation, tarot reading and so much more there are endless opportunities to help with your individual healing. It is a space so many souls gravitate to looking for change, transformation and…

Afro, Si! Latina? Onde? – Luana Fernandes Neely

I vividly remember the first time I heard ‘Latina’ in a way that pertained to me, I was seven and my mother was on the phone venting to my Godmother about how my school kept spelling my name wrong, “F-E-R-N-A-N-D-E-S not F-E-R-N-A-N-D-E- Z” for context, I was a predominantly Hispanic school in Arizona so the…

Meet Jessica Jade: The Afro-Latina Organic Skincare Artisan

Skincare is extremely prevalent to many of us, it is instilled into our everyday lifestyle. It is incorporated into our self-care regimes and routines. Having our ski n glow and our melanin shine so wonderfully contributes to us feeling beautiful. Let’s admit it if we have a bomb skincare day or week that makes our…

AM I AFRO-LATINA ENOUGH? 

Afro- Latina speaks community of empowering individuals. It represents a culture of those who Celebrate traditions that deeply root back to the motherland. It signifies the rich Sounds of our ancestors who carried the musical rhythms of Africa with them. It preserves our expression of dance, songs, religion and literature with a Latin twist without neglecting our African roots.  It crosses barriers from SudaAmerica to Centroamerica along to the coast of Puerto Rico. It flows through all facets…

Child of the Diaspora: Being Afro-Latina in America

  By  Kae Ramirez Lashley — My mother is Afro-Panamanian (her mother is Black, her father mestizo) and my father is Bajan (from Barbados). I identify as Black, Afro-Latina, simply Latina, West Indian, or  Caribbean. I know who I am. I never try to deny my African roots. I am not more Black than Latina. I…

Representing her Afro-Latina: Miss Houston Caribbean Queen

  We shape our own identity and it is essential that we understand our own cultural experience. We learned this with Afro-Latina Ashleigh Lugo our recent Miss Houston Caribbean Queen as she embraces her roots and represents her community in pageants.  What is your perspective behind the term” AfroLatina”?  What does it mean to you?…

1 Year Blogging Anniversary!!

By Jenay Wright — I have this voice and I had this dream. It so happened that they both connected through destiny and it was interesting how faith kept them going. Doubts are danger. Doubting is dangerous. I say that twice to reiterate the message that doubts can get in the way of what you…

Vida en Panamá

By Jenay Wright —Before I was aware of the term Afro-Latina, I just said I was Black and Panamanian and this is exactly what I told people when asked what I was. It was verbatim of what represented me. I find when I say I am Latina people would give me the same “Girl stop…